Jeff Jarrett

Jeff Jarrett

Jeff Jarrett

“Ain’t I great?” If you think Jeff Jarrett expected to hear anything other than an affirmative every time he fired that question at the WWE Universe, then you didn’t understand the character of the Fargo strutting, Technicolor dreamcoated country crooner from Music City, USA.

That grinning arrogance — matched with a predilection for smashing guys over the head with a guitar — made Jarrett a career villain in both WWE and WCW. He was a successful one, too, with four reigns as WCW World Heavyweight Champion and six as WWE Intercontinental Champion with the bulk of his runs coming during a particularly excellent stretch for that title.

The son of Nashville wrestling promoter Jerry Jarrett, Double J began his career as a referee, but soon enjoyed the benefits that the spawns of ring power players have always been handed. But Jarrett — unlike, say, Erik Watts — had a skillset that allowed him to succeed beyond his father’s safety net.

Introduced to WWE audiences in 1993 as an obnoxious country singer, Double J draped himself in garish light-up clothing and capped off all his interviews by spelling out his full name and asking, “Ain’t I great?” His shtick could be grating, but his success was undeniable as he wrestled the Intercontinental Title away from Razor Ramon on more than one occasion.

Jarrett’s musician act unraveled when it was revealed that The Roadie (who would later gain his own fame as Road Dogg) had performed the vocals on Double J’s “hit” song “With My Baby Tonight.” The humiliation sent Jarrett running to WCW where he would act as both a Four Horseman and a Four Horseman turncoat during a year with the company.

Jarrett’s reinvention as a tough, Southern villain during WWE’s “Attitude Era” has largely been forgotten — although a partnership with Owen Hart was as entertaining as it was successful — but he had a run of luck with the persona in WCW. Reintroduced to the organization as “The Chosen One,” Jarrett blasted so many guys with guitars even The Honky Tonk Man had to be like, “Dude, ease up.” Still, he managed to parlay his Pete Townsend impression into a spot as one of the top villains of the company’s post-boom period.

Double J didn’t make it back to WWE after the 2001 buyout of WCW — in fact, he was publicly fired by Mr. McMahon on the final Raw before WrestleMania X-Seven — but he continues to play an influential role in sports-entertainment as both a promoter and a persona to this day. For the indelible mark he made on sports-entertainment, Jeff Jarrett will be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2018. Ain’t that great?

Lyssa Chapman

Lyssa Chapman

Lyssa Chapman

Lyssa Chapman, ninth child of the world famous bounty hunter Duane “Dog” Chapman, was, at eighteen years old, the youngest licensed bail bondsperson in Hawaii. Lyssa bounty hunted with her family for eight seasons on A&E’s hit TV show, Dog The Bounty Hunter. She is a small business owner in Honolulu and founder of the nonprofit organization Proper Choices, Inc. Lyssa spends her time with her daughters, Abbie and Madalynn, and gives positive direction to teen moms.

Naomi Judd

Naomi Judd

Naomi Judd

NY Times best Selling Author

Naomi Judd is a tour-de-force. She made country music history and charmed Hollywood, but her story is far more than a heartwarming rags-to-riches tale. It is a quintessentially American lesson in perseverance and the life-altering power of positive thinking.

The single mom and registered nurse from small-town Kentucky first captured the hearts of the world performing with her daughter Wynonna. The Judds sold 20 million records, scored fifteen #1 hits, and received more than sixty industry awards, including six Grammys and seven consecutive CMA Vocal Group of the Year trophies.

But, the incredible journey of the mother-daughter duo was cut short when Naomi was stricken with Hepatitis C, a potentially fatal chronic liver disease that she contracted from an infected needle while working as a nurse. The Mayo Clinic gave Naomi three years to live, and in 1991, The Judds bid their fans farewell.

Instead of submitting to her devastating diagnosis, Naomi fought back, both physically and mentally. Today, she is more than a survivor. She is Hepatitis C-free—a medically documented miracle. Along with the combination of her medical teams and the unyielding support she received from friends and colleagues, she attributes much of her amazing recovery to her own stubborn optimism.

In addition to profoundly changing her life personally, the experience led Naomi to her current mission: to empower people through holistic health and wellness advocacy that incorporates the mind, body, and spirit.

Naomi’s tenacity, empathy, and intellectual curiosity have made her the ideal bridge between medical leaders and everyday people. She understands the concerns and fears of the single mom and the sick, the poor and the downtrodden, because she has traveled those same roads.

“My message is to help people understand that our thoughts can help us or hurt us,” Naomi says. “Whatever we believe becomes our biology.”

In 2004, Naomi published the self-penned Naomi’s Breakthrough Guide: 20 Choices to Transform Your Life, which remained on the New York Times bestseller list for more than eight weeks. Naomi’s Guide to Aging Gratefully: Facts, Myths, and Good News for Boomers hit shelves and impressed critics, medical professionals, and fans in 2008. In 2012, she hosted a six-week SiriusXM radio series entitled “Think Twice.”

The first national spokesperson for the American Liver Foundation and a current member of Dr. Andrew Weil’s board of directors, Naomi is a sought-after partner for social awareness campaigns and associations. She is also an accomplished children’s and cook book author, veteran talk show host, and versatile actress. Music and mentorship remain two of her deepest passions, evidenced when she helped launch CMT’s reality music competition Can You Duet in 2008 and 2009, along with her 2010 reunion with Wynonna, “The Judds: The Last Encore Tour,” chronicled by the hit docu-series “The Judds,” which aired on OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network in 2011.

A devoted humanitarian and born activist, she also continues her work with the National Humane Society, River Cities Harvest, the Saint Louis University Liver Center, M.A.D.D., Parents Television Council, Make-A-Difference Day, Women’s World Peace Initiative, the National Domestic Violence Hotline, and her own event, the July 4th Judd’s Annual Food Drive, which benefits the families of Appalachia.

Pete Rose

Pete Rose

Pete Rose

Pete Rose, Sr., nicknamed “Charlie Hustle”, is a former player and manager in Major League Baseball. Rose played from 1963 to 1986, best known for his many years with the Cincinnati Reds. Rose, a switch hitter, is the all-time Major League leader in hits (4,256), games played (3,562), at bats (14,053), and outs (10,328). He won three World Series rings, three batting titles, one Most Valuable Player Award, two Gold Gloves, the Rookie of the Year Award, and made 17 All-Star appearances at an unequaled five different positions (2B, LF, RF, 3B, and 1B). Rose’s nickname, “Charlie Hustle”, was given to him for his play beyond the “call of duty” while on the field. Even when being walked, Rose would run to first base, instead of the traditional walk to base. Rose was also known for sliding headfirst into a base, his signature move.

In August 1989, three years after he retired as an active player, Rose agreed to permanent ineligibility from baseball amidst accusations that he gambled on baseball games while playing for and managing the Reds; some accusations claimed that he bet on, and even against, the Reds. After years of public denial, in 2004, he admitted to betting on, but not against, the Reds. After Rose’s ban was instated, the Baseball Hall of Fame formally voted to ban those on the “permanently ineligible” list from induction. Previously, those who were banned (most notably, Shoeless Joe Jackson) had been excluded by informal agreement among voters. The issue of his possible re-instatement and election to the Hall of Fame remains a contentious one throughout baseball.

Since retiring, Pete has lived in California and Nevada and been active with autograph signings and personal appearances.

Suzanne Alexander

Suzanne Alexander

Suzanne Alexander

“I have always felt like I was on a mission to let people know about country music,” shares Suzanne Alexander, who has been a host on the GAC Network since 2002. “It is what I’ve done for more than 12 years. As the host of GAC Nights and On The Streets, there is no better way to reach people all over the country and let them know about the artists and let them see and hear the music coming out of Nashville.” Since coming to GAC, Suzanne has interviewed everyone from Toby Keith to Wynonna Judd to Vince Gill to her hero, Reba McEntire.